Month: November 2011

Month: November 2011

How Do They Learn?

“The Pain of Learning” by Angelo Bronzine. Image in the public domain. This image, “The Pain of Learning,”┬áby Angelo Bronzine, is a pretty good representation of how a lot of folks think learning ought to look. So how do unschoolers learn? He couldn’t have told you where he learned it. Or when. I doubt he

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Month: November 2011

Month: November 2011

Month: November 2011

Month: November 2011

Topic List for History Co-op

I realized I forgot to add a list of potential topics for the history co-op in my previous post, so here it is. Of course this list is not exhaustive, but it’s a good place to start. Let each child choose his or her preferred topic area. I personally think it’s best to encourage everyone

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Month: November 2011

How to Homeschool History Painlessly!

I don’t teach our homeschool history co-op class. Instead, I facilitate independent and autonomous self-studies initiated by the students. It’s not as complicated as it sounds, and it’s a fun, easy co-op method that works well for any type of homeschooling, even unschooling! Our history class comprises about twelve kids age 10 to 16, all

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Month: November 2011

A Day in the Life

One of the most consistent questions homeschoolers and unschoolers get is “what is a typical homeschool day like for you?” It will always look different from one family to another, and often will look different in one family from one day or week to another! For an unschooly family, our current schedule is pretty hectic.

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Month: November 2011

My Favorite Comic

Welcome to my favorite comic strip! Okay, I admit … I might be bit biased. This is a 100% homeschool comic strip, brought to life by three real-life homeschooled teens. The author is my 13-year-old son, and the storyline is one he’s worked on for about two years. The sketch artist is an 18-year-old friend.

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Month: November 2011

10,000 Hours

When the Beatles were a fledgling band, they went to Hamburg, Germany, and spent several years playing more than 1,200 live shows in clubs and bars, accumulating over 10,000 hours of playing time. When they returned to England, they were a slick, professional band with a startling new sound no one had heard before. According

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